About Kate Rice

Kate Rice fell in love with vinyasa yoga at her gym in Washington, DC about 8 years ago. She returned to her Chicago roots after teaching English in eastern Europe and completed yoga teacher training in 2014.  Passionate about making yoga more accessible, Kate has completed trauma informed yoga trainings (Street Yoga, Prison Yoga and others) as well as 40 hours of sexual violence crisis intervention training in order to teach yoga to survivors served by the YWCA counseling center. Read more from Kate on her blog. In addition to public classes yoga at Cook County Jail through Yoga for Recovery. Follow her work at shareyourpractice.org (which now also offers a directory of trauma informed yoga trainings throughout the US).

All posts by Kate Rice:

Teaching Yoga, Not Just Alignment

My trauma informed yoga classes are largely made up of postures and breath, with some simple breath movement coordination. I don’t typically bring in philosophy or verbal themes, but my classes are still about more than alignment. How? Of course, alignment has a role in a physical yoga class, for basic safety, and as a tool […]

Something for (Almost) Everyone

How can a power/vinyasa trained yoga instructor offer a more accessible class? My 200-hour yoga teacher training is in power vinyasa yoga, but I teach in a variety of settings where it’s essential to make classes accessible to a broader range of experience levels that usually appear in a yoga studio class.

Yoga & Privilege

“Privilege: a special right, advantage or immunity granted or available to only a particular person or group of people” (Google dictionary)

While it’s nice to imagine we all teach yoga from a neutral place, our life experiences – including those of privilege or lack thereof – shape us. In yoga service classes, I sometimes work with people who have had substantially different access to privilege than me. How does my identity influence what I offer? What do I do to minimize negative impact?

How to Set Up Your Own Yoga Service Class

Are you a yoga teacher hoping to teach yoga in prisons, at shelters, or to at-risk youth? Starting a yoga service class is no small task. Learn about trauma informed yoga and find ideas on next steps below.

Training in Trauma Informed Yoga

If you’ve thought about teaching yoga in a jail, domestic violence shelter, or youth group home, you’ve probably wondered how trauma informed yoga is different from “regular” yoga. Now, how do you get training … and do you really need it if you’re already a 200-hour or 500-hour yoga teacher?

How is trauma sensitive yoga different than traditional yoga?

Trauma sensitive yoga is a term that’s quickly making it’s way into mainstream yoga.  More and more you see classes and trainings that focus on this – as there is an obvious need for teachers who are aware and trained to share this with those in need.  But what exactly does trauma sensitive mean?  Who is it for?  Why do we need it? Kate Rice, Chicago-based trauma-sensitive yoga teacher, shares some insight.

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